UnderGraduate catalog: 2020/21 term 1

General Education Courses

Courses Offered in Arabic For the Arabic Division

Arabic Composition 2 (Proctored Course)

This course is designed to introduce students to the concept and application of an academic research paper and its components. Students will learn how to use critical thinking to develop and draft a thesis. In addition, this course features genre studies which enables students to analyze, address, and resolve various problems. Students are encouraged to develop creative solutions rooted in their own intellectual strengths to build their academic and personal growth. By the end of the course, students will create a self-exploratory collegiate level research paper.

Course Code: ARABC 1102
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Introduction to Statistics (Proctored course)

This course presents students with basic concepts in statistics and probability and encourages statistical thinking. It is intended to bring students to a level where they can carry out statistical analyses of simple data. Topics covered include descriptive statistics, probability, discrete and continuous random variables, the sampling distribution and the Central Limit Theorem. The R statistical programming environment is used for computation, graphical presentation, and simulations. The presentation of statistical methods and interpretation of outcomes are emphasized in this course. The philosophy of statistics rather than mathematics are at the center of this course; needed mathematical concepts are demonstrated via simulations rather than abstract proofs.

Course Code in Arabic: MATHA 1280
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Ethics and Social Responsibility

The approach of this course adheres to the scope and sequence of a typical introductory business ethics course that relates ethical theories of philosophy to questions typically found in the economic world. In addition to a comprehensive coverage of key theories of ethics, business situations in which they are regularly applied, and representative case studies that can be found in reading materials, student assignments for this course are organized around engaging questions, discussions that help students apply the ethical theories, and moral issues that advance learners toward the understanding of business ethics in meaningful ways.

Course Code in Arabic: PHILA 1404
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Introduction to Psychology

Psychology is defined as the scientific study of the human mind and its functions, especially those affecting behavior in a given context. Most people associate psychology with clinical issues, such as abnormal psychology, but it encompasses many different aspects of our lives from individual development, social interactions, and physiological aspects of human behavior. This course provides an overview of the major fields in psychology with an emphasis on empirical evidence on the science of human thought and behavior.

Course Code in Arabic: PSYC 1504
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Introduction to Sociology

This course is designed to acquaint students with: (1) what sociology is, (2) what sociologists have done in the past, (3) what sociologists are currently doing, (4) how sociologists perceive the social world, and (5) how we can better understand our social world and the social worlds of people from other cultures.

Course Code in Arabic: SOCA 1502
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Courses Offered in English for the English program and Arabic for the Arabic Division.

Online Education Strategies

Offered in English in the English program and Arabic in the Arabic program.
This course is required for all students and is a preparation for a successful journey into the University’s online environment. It introduces students to the University of the People library, the resources available to them, our academic methods, and the policies and expectations for student performance. Further, it provides an overview of strategies for student success including time and stress management, effective study skills, and personal ownership of the learning process.

Course Code in English: UNIV 1001
Course Code in Arabic : UNIVA 1001
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Art History

This survey course in Western Art History will explore art as a cultural production. This introduction to the academic discipline will familiarize students with major movements and styles of art as well as the various media and purposes of artistic production. The relationship of the visual arts and the individual artist to their society and culture will also be explored.

Course Code in English: AHIST 1401
Course Code in Arabic : AHISTA 1401
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Business Communications

The purpose of this course is to build an understanding of effective uses of English/Arabic in a business environment and to develop strong core business communication skills. This course introduces and enhances the varying modes of English/Arabic communication in the business environment and focuses on when to use these varying modes, depending on the situation. Students are provided the tools to function in a cross-cultural, global business environment and develop an understanding of the best techniques for successful communication in varying business contexts.

Course Code in English: BUS 1105
Course Code in Arabic : BUSA 1105
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

College Algebra (Proctored Course)

This course provides a solid grounding in algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry in preparation for further mathematical studies. The course includes an extensive study of linear, quadratic, and rational functions. It also contains an introduction to exponential and logarithmic functions and circles. Finally, the topic of systems of linear equations is covered.

Course Code in English: MATH 1201
Course Code in Arabic: MATHA 1201
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Calculus

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the core concepts of differential calculus, covering a wide range of topics. Content includes both applications and theory of differential calculus leading to an introduction of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Learners will continue to refine independent study skills, problem solving, logically correct and mathematically precise writing and thinking, and their ability to use geometric, symbolic, and analytic formats in presenting solutions to both abstract and real world applications. Class activities will include lectures/discussions as well as tests and quizzes. All communications shall be delivered in writing.

Course Code in English: MATH 1211
Prerequisites in English: MATH 1201
Course Code in Arabic: MATHA 1211
Prerequisites in Arabic: MATHA 1201
Credits: 3

Greek and Roman Civilization

This course includes selected readings from Homer, Plato’s Dialogues, views on the rise of democracy, and a brief description of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. Students will address the question: in what ways did Greek and Roman civilization provide the foundations for the development of western culture?

Course Code in English : HIST 1421
Course Code in Arabic : HISTA 1421
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Discrete Mathematics

This course is primarily intended for students majoring in Computer Science. It emphasizes the development of technical discrete mathematics skills, rather than rigorous proof. Topics will include number systems, sets, logic, induction, elementary counting techniques, relations, functions, matrices, and Boolean algebra.

Course Code in English: MATH 1302
Course Code in Arabic : MATHA 1302
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Globalization

This course examines changes in national economies over the past half century. Special attention is given to the ways in which globalization impacts citizenship, ethnic and religious issues, migration, public health, poverty, and wealth. The cross-cultural context affords the opportunity to address issues of a global nature which may profoundly influence the conditions under which people live and work.

Course Code in English: POLS 1503
Course Code in Arabic: POLSA 1503
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Introduction to Biology

This introductory course defines biology and its relationship to other sciences. We examine the overarching theories of life from biological research and explore the fundamental concepts and principles of the study of living organisms and their interaction with the environment. We examine how life is organized into hierarchical levels; how living organisms use and produce energy; how life grows, develops, and reproduces; how life responds to the environment to maintain internal stability; and how life evolves and adapts to the environment.

Course Code in English: BIOL 1301
Course Code in Arabic: BIOLA 1301
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Introduction to Economics

This course provides an introduction to economics as well as an overview of macroeconomics and microeconomics. Course topics include the operations of a market economy, money and banking, the relations between business organizations and government regulatory agencies, optimal allocation of resources, price stability and long-term growth.

Course Code in English: ECON 1580
Course Code in Arabic: ECONA 1580
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Introduction to Philosophy

This course traces the origins of philosophical thinking from Socrates and Plato in Ancient Greece to great thinkers of modern times. The profound questions they posed about reality, ethics, and knowledge still challenges us today. This course emphasizes how philosophy is a manner of thinking about the most basic problems faced by ordinary people. Students are encouraged to examine the ideas and answer the questions of the philosophers as they impact their own lives.

Course Code in English: PHIL 1402
Course Code in Arabic: PHILA 1402
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Courses Offered in English For the English program

Biology 1 for Health Studies Majors

This course introduces main concepts in biology that are common to most living organisms. It covers topics in biochemistry, cell biology, and genetics, which illustrate how molecules are organized into cells. Cells constitute the basic unit of life, and genes are central to information flow within and between cells. In addition, this course makes use of assignments to introduce experimental methods and research data repositories. Through these activities, students learn how to approach a complex problem and find information relevant to a specific question or method. This course is designed both as a prerequisite to the study of biology at the organism or population level and as a general introduction to how biological knowledge is being produced.

Course Code: BIOL 1121
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 4

Introduction to Statistics (Proctored course)

This course presents students with basic concepts in statistics and probability and encourages statistical thinking. Topics covered include descriptive statistics, probability, discrete and continuous random variables, the sampling distribution and the Central Limit Theorem. The R statistical programming environment is used for computation, graphical presentation, and simulations.

Course Code in English: MATH 1280
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Ethics and Social Responsibility

This course explores Western and non-Western approaches to ethical reasoning, and the social implications of unethical behavior. Current professional ethics as well as cultural values will be analyzed, and students will be asked to reconcile these with personal beliefs in order to prepare them for taking responsibility for their actions in the world.
Course Code in English: PHIL 1404
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Introduction to Psychology

This course covers the basic principles of psychology, its common approaches, and its theoretical underpinnings. As both a research and applied discipline, Psychology involves the study of mental processes and behavior and will facilitate better understanding of the relationship between mind and body, and the self and other.
Course Code in English: PSYC 1504
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Introduction to Sociology

This course studies and compares social groups and institutions and their interrelationships. Special topics covered in the course include culture, socialization, deviance, stratification, race, ethnicity, social changes, and collective behavior. As an introduction to the scientific discipline of Sociology, students will have the opportunity to analyze what we know and what we think we know as citizens, individuals, and as novice sociologists.
Course Code in English: SOC 1502
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Emotional Intelligence

This course examines the concepts and practical applications of emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is the ability to manage one’s own internal emotional environment and one’s ability to participate in relationships with others. Through a highly interactive format, the course will focus on how to assess basic skills in emotional intelligence, how to develop strategies to improve and enhance basic skill levels, and how to experiment with techniques that facilitate dealing with others of varying emotional backgrounds and competency levels.
Course Code: PSYC 1205
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

English Composition 1 (Proctored Course)

UoPeople offers an alternative route for demonstrating English language proficiency for international students who are not from an English-speaking country and whose high school language of instruction was not English and/or have not demonstrated that they possess the minimum level of required competency. They may be provisionally admitted to take this preparatory course that provides a review of reading, grammar, and writing prior to taking a qualifying examination. Students must successfully pass all aspects of the course, pass the qualifying examination at the end of the course, and earn a comprehensive overall grade of 73% or higher to be eligible to be accepted as a non-degree student to take regular courses. Students whose final grade is less than a 73% will not pass the course but will be eligible to take ENGL 0101 English Composition 1 and the qualifying examination one additional time only. Students who do not earn a passing grade on the second try are not eligible for regular admission and are dismissed without appeal.

Course Code: ENGL 0101
Prerequisites: None
Credits: Not applicable. Not a credit earning course.

English Composition 2 (Proctored Course)

This course is designed to foster skills in critical reading and thinking, and in the production and evaluation of purposeful academic writing. Students are introduced to literary genres, rhetorical patterns in writing, and the use and citation of research sources. They gain practice in clear, effective writing, with an emphasis on the academic research paper and its components. By the end of the course students will produce a paper of collegiate quality.

Course Code: ENGL 1102
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Introduction to Environmental Sciences

This is a multidisciplinary course that will bring together data collected from various scientific fields to help students understand the environment, current environmental problems and solutions to these problems. The course will cover topics that include biodiversity conservation, agriculture-related environmental impacts, environmental effects of human populations and urbanization, the consequences of society’s dependence on fossil fuel and solutions using alternative energy sources, environmental waste or pollutants affecting land, water and air and lastly environmental economics, ethics, policy and sustainable living.

Course Code: ENVS 1301
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Introduction to Health Psychology

Psychology is defined as the scientific study of the human mind and its functions, especially those affecting behavior in a given context. This course will draw upon health psychology, public health, and community psychology to emphasize how psychology contributes to overall health, as well as the cause, progression, and outcomes of physical illness. This course will highlight the many roles that psychology plays in health and illness including, the role of health behaviors and behavior change; beliefs about illness; symptom perception; help-seeking and communication with health professions; stress, pain and chronic conditions such as obesity, coronary heart disease and HIV; the role of gender on health; and health outcomes in terms of quality of life and life expectancy.

Course Code: PSYC 1111
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Statistical Inference

This course covers inferential statistics, estimation, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis in the course is on the presentation of statistical methods and on the interpretation of the outcome. The philosophy and practice of statistics and not its mathematics is at the center. Needed mathematical computations are demonstrated via simulations rather than by abstract proofs. The R system for data analysis is used as part of the teaching.

Course Code: MATH 1281
Prerequisites: MATH 1280
Credits: 3

World Literature

This course is designed to introduce students to the structural concepts of world literature and to how to read critically with an emphasis on analysis and synthesis. The course will focus on both verbal and visual literacy via critical reading exercises. By the end of the course, the student will have conducted both practical and practice-based research in the area of world literature. Literary selections from a number of different cultures are introduced.

Course Code: ENGL 1405
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3

Independent Study

In those rare instances when a student has completed all other degree requirements and needs a particular course to graduate that term, the Office of Academic Affairs may, as its discretion, direct the student to complete an independent study experience. Students assigned to an independent study experience will work one-on-one to fulfill the course requirement, which will typically include additional writing requirements, exams and/or an end-of-term research project. Students must be pre-approved prior to registration by the Office of Academic Affairs.